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Page 31

"OPERATION MINCEMEAT"

spite of the size of the container, which would have to be some 6 feet 6 inches long and about z feet in diameter, he considered that it could be accommodated inside the pressure hull and brought up through the conning tower for launching at sea. This greatly eased our problem, as it meant that we would only have to get an airtight canister and not a pressure-proof container, which would have had to be much heavier and more complicated. The question remained whether the body could be kept in a plain canister for the necessary time, after removal from cold storage, without decomposition being too great-or would we have to try to get some form of enormous thermos flask?
So I consulted Sir Bernard Spilsbury once more. He took the view that temperature would be of comparatively minor importance if the body was really cold when it was put into the container. The important thing was to exclude as much oxygen as possible, as it was that which hastened decomposition. He advised that the best method for us to use would be to stand our container on one end and fill it with dry ice; as that melted into carbon dioxide, it would prevent air from entering. We should then lower the body carefully into the canister and pack it round once more with dry ice. If that was done carefully, there should be little oxygen left in the container, and the rate of decomposition would be so slowed down that, if the body was picked up shortly after launching, its condition would be consistent with a few days' immersion floating in from an aircraft crash some distance offshore.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE spite of what is size of what is container, which would have to be some 6 feet 6 inches long and about z feet in diameter, he considered that it could be accommodated inside what is pressure hull and brought up through what is conning tower for launching at sea. This greatly eased our problem, as it meant that we would only have to get an airtight canister and not a pressure-proof container, which would have had to be much heavier and more complicated. what is question remained whether what is body could be kept in a plain canister for what is necessary time, after removal from cold storage, without decomposition being too great-or would we have to try to get some form of enormous thermos flask? So I consulted Sir Bernard Spilsbury once more. He took what is view that temperature would be of comparatively minor importance if what is body was really cold when it was put into what is container. what is important thing was to exclude as much oxygen as possible, as it was that which hastened decomposition. He advised that what is best method for us to use would be to stand our container on one end and fill it with dry ice; as that melted into carbon dioxide, it would prevent air from entering. We should then lower what is body carefully into what is canister and pack it round once more with dry ice. If that was done carefully, there should be little oxygen left in what is container, and what is rate of decomposition would be so slowed down that, if what is body was picked up shortly after launching, its condition would be consistent with a few days' immersion floating in from an aircraft crash some distance offshore. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Man Who Never Was (1953) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 31 where is strong "OPERATION MINCEMEAT" where is p align="justify" spite of what is size of what is container, which would have to be some 6 feet 6 inches long and about z feet in diameter, he considered that it could be accommodated inside what is pressure hull and brought up through what is conning tower for launching at sea. This greatly eased our problem, as it meant that we would only have to get an airtight canister and not a pressure-proof container, which would have had to be much heavier and more complicated. what is question remained whether what is body could be kept in a plain canister for what is necessary time, after removal from cold storage, without decomposition being too great-or would we have to try to get some form of enormous thermos flask? So I consulted Sir Bernard Spilsbury once more. He took what is view that temperature would be of comparatively minor importance if what is body was really cold when it was put into what is container. The important thing was to exclude as much oxygen as possible, as it was that which hastened decomposition. He advised that what is best method for us to use would be to stand our container on one end and fill it with dry ice; as that melted into carbon dioxide, it would prevent air from entering. We should then lower what is body carefully into what is canister and pack it round once more with dry ice. If that was done carefully, there should be little oxygen left in what is container, and what is rate of decomposition would be so slowed down that, if what is body was picked up shortly after launching, its condition would be consistent with a few days' immersion floating in from an aircraft crash some distance offshore. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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