Books > Old Books > The Man Who Never Was (1953)


Page 102

MAJOR MARTIN LANDS IN SPAIN

officer had been called in, and neither he nor his associates had the right kind of contact with that particular official.
Although we were confident that all had gone well, we wanted a final check, and we waited impatiently for the return of the documents that Major Martin had carried; eventually they reached London and were promptly submitted to scientific tests. Before sending them out, we had taken precautions, which I obviously cannot specify, which would help us to check whether the envelopes had been tampered with and, though the immersion in sea water made certainty impossible, we were now able to say with some degree of confidence from the physical evidence that the letters, or at least two of them, had been removed from the envelopes, although the seals appeared to be intact.
When we added this information to that which we had received from Huelva and from the Naval Attache, we were quite satisfied. There was little doubt that the Spaniards had extracted the letters and knew what was in them, and that the German Intelligence Service knew of the important addressees; we could rely an the efficiency of the Germans to get all that they wanted out of that situation. We were sure that our confidence in the Spanish end of the German Intelligence Service would not be misplaced. It was now up to Berlin to play its part.
Meanwhile, we must say farewell to Major Martin. He had served his country well, and we felt that it was up to us to see that his last resting-place should be a fitting one and that proper tribute should be

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE officer had been called in, and neither he nor his associates had what is right kind of contact with that particular official. Although we were confident that all had gone well, we wanted a final check, and we waited impatiently for what is return of what is documents that Major Martin had carried; eventually they reached London and were promptly submitted to scientific tests. Before sending them out, we had taken precautions, which I obviously cannot specify, which would help us to check whether what is envelopes had been tampered with and, though what is immersion in sea water made certainty impossible, we were now able to say with some degree of confidence from what is physical evidence that what is letters, or at least two of them, had been removed from what is envelopes, although what is seals appeared to be intact. When we added this information to that which we had received from Huelva and from what is Naval Attache, we were quite satisfied. There was little doubt that what is Spaniards had extracted what is letters and knew what was in them, and that what is German Intelligence Service knew of what is important addressees; we could rely an what is efficiency of what is Germans to get all that they wanted out of that situation. We were sure that our confidence in what is Spanish end of what is German Intelligence Service would not be misplaced. It was now up to Berlin to play its part. Meanwhile, we must say farewell to Major Martin. He had served his country well, and we felt that it was up to us to see that his last resting-place should be a fitting one and that proper tribute should be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Man Who Never Was (1953) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 102 where is strong MAJOR MARTIN LANDS IN SPAIN where is p align="justify" officer had been called in, and neither he nor his associates had what is right kind of contact with that particular official. Although we were confident that all had gone well, we wanted a final check, and we waited impatiently for what is return of what is documents that Major Martin had carried; eventually they reached London and were promptly submitted to scientific tests. Before sending them out, we had taken precautions, which I obviously cannot specify, which would help us to check whether what is envelopes had been tampered with and, though what is immersion in sea water made certainty impossible, we were now able to say with some degree of confidence from the physical evidence that what is letters, or at least two of them, had been removed from what is envelopes, although what is seals appeared to be intact. When we added this information to that which we had received from Huelva and from what is Naval Attache, we were quite satisfied. There was little doubt that what is Spaniards had extracted what is letters and knew what was in them, and that what is German Intelligence Service knew of what is important addressees; we could rely an what is efficiency of what is Germans to get all that they wanted out of that situation. We were sure that our confidence in what is Spanish end of what is German Intelligence Service would not be misplaced. It was now up to Berlin to play its part. Meanwhile, we must say farewell to Major Martin. He had served his country well, and we felt that it was up to us to see that his last resting-place should be a fitting one and that proper tribute should be where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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